NAME:Tati Cotliar
SPECIALISM:Fashion
LOCATION:Worldwide
MATERIALS:X 10 objects and counting

Overview of Voyage D'etudes

Tati has been the face of Vivienne Westwood, Valentino, Proenza Schouler, Prada, Mulberry, Paul Smith, Marc Jacobs and Nina Ricci. Cotliar was a high school student at Colegio Nacional de Buenos Aires, then at CIEVYC, a cinema school in Buenos Aires and has directed 2 short films. Currently living in New York, she is known for her off beat style and is constantly unearthing wonderful young design talents leading her to be asked more and more to have an input in styling projects. Since Tati started working as a model five years ago she has travelled a lot but explains. “I’d never traveled anywhere before being a model, so to me one of the most exciting aspects of modelling was the chance to travel to a lot of countries.”

I always thought that grocery stores give you the perfect idea of how the society it is in works and thinks. Candy are something that exists everywhere, every country has their own, I’m yet to find a nation with no sweet tooth. The ways that things are displayed in the aisles and the kind of sweets they eat are a microcosm associated with the way they see life in general. Something like a sweet is common to everybody’s taste buds, so it’s interesting to see how people’s imagination works to make it different, or more original, according to what they find tasty or what kind of products they’re used to work with.

 

 

JAPANESE CANDY

I’m fascinated by Japanese food, when I went to Tokyo, the last thing that I thought would capture my attention was something sweet. I didn’t even know that they could actually make one of the most interesting textures I’ve ever tried. I never even thought they ate sweets!! But it’s something I’ve never experienced before, something strange, something unknown. I always say that, you can go to any western country, and even if you don’t know the sweet or dessert, you can always tell a familiar texture, or flavor; but in this case, I couldn’t understand how they could think that this flavor/texture could be tasty.

Mochi candy is one of the most addictive sweets I’ve ever tasted, and for sure, the most bizarre.Obviously, the best ones are the ones they sell on the little stands by the street fairs, or outside temples.

Conclusion

Yes. The most shocking reference that I found was in Japan. When I realized that their idea of something sweet and tasty was  translated to a different and unknown texture. It was like a 180 degrees twist to my taste buds, as well as my imagination and head.

Sweets are something that are completely part of childhood life, because sugar is associated with instant satisfaction, and that’s what kids respond too. So sweets are given to kids to please them, to make them happier from one second to the next one. What’s interesting to me, is to see how then adults think of this satisfaction, how to make it happen, and how they translate that to please themselves. I’ve always behaved like a kid in a lot of aspects of my life, but in this case, I associate a sweet to that happy moment in my childhood, so I try to bring that feeling to myself constantly, because it makes me feel good, it gives me that innocent happiness back, almost like a symptomatic medicine to calm all the problems of grownup life.

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